Tag Archives: mark making

Project 9: Experimental mark making – version two

Tools for Experimental print making second version

Tools for Experimental print making second version

I dug around our garage to try and find some more tools for cutting a new piece of lino, I took a photo (above) of those I picked to mark the surface. I chose tools which I thought might mark the surface more substantially and therefore come across more clearer in the printing stage.

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Exploring hand drawn type faces…

A few weeks ago I posted a question onto the OCA student forum about learning how to progress from hand drawn to digital techniques, here’s what I said:

“I’m studying Graphic Design: Core concepts 1 at the moment. I’ve submitted my first assignment and part of the feedback I received focused on me needing to learn how to combine hand based techniques with digital techniques. This is something I’m interested in but don’t really know how to go about.

For instance, at the moment it’s much easier for me to create lettering by hand. When I design something by hand it looks much more coherent, even much more engaging than if I try doing it all in a program like In Design or Illustrator. Does anyone have any tips for learning how to use these programs to enhance hand rendered techniques?”

I got some surprising replies, a few of which I’ve used to help me learn more. One person in particular encouraged me to pursue hand drawn type and gave some tips for improving hand drawn lettering, which I’m taking on board and doing. Here’s what she said:

“I would suggest printing off a variety of typefaces- a whole alphabet of each, at different sizes.

Try three approaches – firstly choose a lower case letter without ascenders or descenders (such as an a, e, o, etc) draw a pair of tram lines horizontally the height and base of the letter (this is called the x height). Use these tram lines to trace out whole words and short phrases, being conscious about spacing and where to position one letter relative to another,   secondly trace over the type to create words without the tram lines and lastly do the same without tracing.

At each stage it’s good to be aware of the shapes of the letters and how they connect and the spaces between the words. At the last stage allow yourself to distort if you want to- make the letters unique and have personality by varying the line weight, allowing some bits to wobble, or choosing a media to work with which make an interesting line- pens, pencils, felt tips….be experimental- it’s all good for the learning log!

Collecting examples of captions and type that you enjoy and copying them freehand using different materials and maybe at a different scale than they were originally printed will help you to develop a confidence with hand drawing type and a freedom in making your own.”

I began to trace over two different type faces last week, although I’ve re-read what was recommended and I’ve managed to do it slightly differently. I didn’t use tram lines, and instead of print off different sizes of the fonts I’ve done them all the same size but each alphabet in: normal, bold and italic format.

Trace of Banda regular font

Trace of Banda regular font

Trace of Amatic Sc font

Trace of Amatic Sc font

I’m going to do the tram line thing and other recommendations with another font called ‘Adobe caslon pro bold’.

 

 

 

Project 4: Abstract Textured Print

My final print is one that I want to be much more lose with. I’ve started with a print taken from the printing plate having already impressed linen on top to give a texture.

Linen Strips and Textured print

Linen Strips and Textured print

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I’d like to use a series of colours in this print, a light blue, light grey, dark grey, yellow and orange.

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Printmaking Project 1 – Exploring Monoprinting

Getting started on the Printmaking Project proved a bit tricky! I knew I needed to buy printing inks, and rollers, inking trays and an surface to ink on but I didn’t really know where to start. I emailed my tutor and ended up buying Caligo Safe Wash Oil based Relief Ink (I may have spelt that incorrectly!)

I went for primary colour and a black and white tube, thinking I could mix my own colours, rather than the cost of buying a large variety of colours up front.

Brand New Unused Ink!!

Brand New Unused Ink!!

I knew that White Spirit would work as a thinner for any paint that was oil based, and seeing as I had some at home thought I’d use that to begin with. There were some interesting results that led to me changing what I used, but more on that later.

The point of this project is to learn the basic form of printmaking: Monoprinting.

This involves using brushes, cloth, any kind of mark maker to place the ink onto a printing plate, once the ink is on the plate, you lay paper over it and using the back of your hand rub the back of the paper to reveal your first ‘print’.

My first attempt looked like this:

Printing Ink on Printing plate - First go!

Printing Ink on Printing plate – First go!

First Monoprint on Watercolour Paper

First Monoprint on Watercolour Paper

Taking a close look at the Printing Plate (a sheet of perspex) you can see that the consistancy of the ink is quite lose, I wasn’t sure this was right, think I used too much White Spirit to thin the ink:

Close up of Printing Plate

Close up of Printing Plate

This led me to change the amounts of White Spirit I added to the ink for the next print.

I used two types of brushes and the back of a pen to make the marks on the printing plate. The Orange arch shape at the top was created using a rough house painting brush which I think gives a nice lose, textured feel.
Whilst the orange wiggley lines were created with a smooth watercolour brush, which I’d kept in good condition, it gives a much smoother line, but it’s more transparent than the rough line.
The blue dots were made using the back of a pen, and this gives a much richer hit of colour, but maybe there was too much ink transfered onto the plate as some of the dots have smudged!

More experiments to follow…