Tag Archives: Exercise 1: Designing Messages

Part 3: Exercise 1~ Alternative Messages

For the final part of the exercise I am exploring how visual communication is used by subcultural groups, ordinary people as a tool for protest. There were two groups that came to mind when I began thinking about who to research further; The Guerrilla Girls and The Craftivist Collective. 

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Part 3: Exercise 1~ Interactive Design

Interactive communication is it feels becoming a part of our normal everyday on-line world. I wanted to try and find an example of interactive design from the web as well as from a game design perspective. I’ve explored the work of Wonky Studio as an example of Web Design, and the game Life Is Strange as an example of Game Design.

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Part 3: Exercise 1~ Authorial Content

For this part of the exercise I was initially unsure what to look for. But I took my cue’s from my work-book description and looked for examples of which was, “generating new and engaging content through comics, graphic novels, animation and other media”. It tried also to keep in mind that the objective of the content needed to be “to entertain, satirise or educate”.

Print examples:

Coralie Bickford-Smith; The Fox and The Star

I came across Coralie Bickford-Smith’s work as an illustrator/graphic designer for Penguin Books, she designed the beautiful covers of their Cloth Bound Classics range. But I wanted to focus on her work which she had authorial control over. Her début novel The Fox and The Star, is a good example of authorial content – she has written the text and designed the graphics within.

Front cover of The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Front cover of The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

The front and back covers are beautifully printed onto cloth, they’re incredibly tactile, you have the feel of the cloth but also the raised ink on the surface. The dense illustration on the front is a good foreshadowing of the inside content of the book.The use of just white ink against the navy cloth has a striking effect, making the image appear to jump off the cover. It’s simple but arresting, Bickford-Smith seems to like sticking to a limited colour- palette and this gives a distinct style to her work

Back cover of The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Back cover of The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

The front and back covers seem like a nod to previous older practices of book binding and printing. Which doesn’t really scream new and engaging content, but I think there’s a return to this style of craftsmanship returning to design at the moment which offers a break from high colour, glossy overloaded modern graphics.

 

 

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

I think it’s the inside content of the book, in terms of layout, colour choices, illustrative style that offers a new engaging way of telling a story. There seems to be no strict rules to the layout of the text or illustrations, she uses several different layout formats across the book. Sometimes the illustrations have a large white border and then another central white box for the text to sit inside.On other pages the white text box sits towards the bottom left corner of the image or off centre. I think this encourages your eye to keep moving around the images and also fits well with the story.

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

The fox is searching for a lost Star, so he’s moving around.These quite structured layouts are interspersed with double page images, with little or no text, which allow for a break from reading to just consider the imagery. Again this is unusual for a novel or children’s story. I think this encourages your eye to keep moving around the images and also fits well with the story, the fox is searching for a lost Star, so he’s moving around.

 

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The layout of the text is also played with throughout the book, sometimes sitting within a white box, sometimes dispersed around the page surrounded by illustrations, even zigzagged between an illustration of the fox. I find this a fresh way of playing with text, as often text in a novel follows conventional forms, staying in the same place throughout.

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Inside page from; The Fox And The Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Her use of colour is also refreshing, she sticks to a limited colour palette, again allowing this to be different on alternative sets of pages. I think keeping the colour palette limited keeps everything together, if the colour palette was really varied alongside all the changing layout options I think it would feel disorientating and detract from the story. I think at most there are four colours on a page, and it least two (not including black and white as colours here)! I think the its a bold choice really in an age where lots of graphic design is loaded with colours and saturated tones.

Josh Cochran; New York

Front Cover of New York by Josh Cochran, published by Big Picture Press. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Front Cover of New York by Josh Cochran, published by Big Picture Press. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Perhaps on the opposite end of the design spectrum to Coralie Bickford-Smith is Josh Cochran. Specifically I want to mention a children’s book he published with Big Picture Press, called New York.  I’ve chosen it because it’s a very different format of book to the traditional children’s novel. Firstly there are no words, no real story line, secondly the book unfolds into a giant double sided poster.

 

Accordion folding pages of New York by Josh Cochran, published by Big Picture Press. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Accordion folding pages of New York by Josh Cochran, published by Big Picture Press. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

It’s a bit like the where’s Wally books, but set in New York and without a central character to find. Instead you’re invited to explore New York through the eyes of Josh Cochran in the form of a fun, hectic illustration. I think it mostly aims just to entertain but I suppose there’s a bit of education or exploration thrown in there for young children wanting to learn more about the world we live in.

 

 

The book pages unfolded. New York: Inside & Out, by Josh Cochran.

The book pages unfolded. New York: Inside & Out, by Josh Cochran.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visually you couldn’t get much further opposite in content from The Fox and The Star. The pages are packed with illustrations of buildings, people, rubbish, animals, shop signs etc. The colour use is interesting, there is a certain style to it, there’s a mix of soft and bold, pastel shades and vibrant shades, but it’s certainly not a limited palette. The finish is allowed to be rougher, with pencil marks and shading lines left in, which gives a lively textured finish.

Close up on page from New York by Josh Cochran, published by Big Picture Press. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Close up on page from New York by Josh Cochran, published by Big Picture Press. Photo credit: Christy Archer.

Animation/New media:

The School of Life:

The School of Life, exists to educate and enable people to develop emotional intelligence. It explores all areas of life and uses culture to do so. It makes use of YouTube as a platform for it’s education videos. These video’s explore a range of subjects but also use a range of forms of visual communication. Below is a video about Confidence, which is an animation with an illustrative quality. It seeks to visualize our struggles with confidence, defining it, where it comes from and does so (at least I think) fairly well. Using this medium is interesting, I think having this topic explored through a visual story, where the character is illustrated, instead of watching real people, gives the space to project your self, your own thoughts towards confidence onto the video.

Animation exploring confidence:

They use different formats/types of visuals for different topics. For instance in the video for Design below, a much more busy visual approach is taken.

Cut out images of figures or buildings or objects are animated to move on and off the screen. Some are made to look more humorous by adding googly eyes to them. The images are set to the same backdrop throughout an area of blue texture. It feels like a factual lesson or presentation without becoming dry and boring, I think this is largely due to the moving graphics and fun presentation. To me choosing to explore this content through this medium is about helping people to engage with the topic. It makes use of our limited attention span by keeping the video short, even being on the platform YouTube is part of a recognition of the technology or communication preferences of this age. Also their output of content; a video a week, is in keeping with educating an audience in a world where information travels quickly and attention is short lived.

I’ll leave my thoughts there for now and move on in my next post to Interactive Design…

Part 3: Exercise 1 ~ Identity Design

I needed to find some examples of design which was about creating a particular emotive response or association with brand identity. I chose to look through women’s fashion/lifestyle magazine Red for some examples.  I found two different examples of identity design; one an advert for clothing company Jigsaw, the other for Burt’s Bee’s Lip balm.

Perhaps the Jigsaw advert is designed to be more emotive, as its not entirely clear what in the advert is their product. You can see a scan of the advert below, followed by an annotated version I created using Illustrator. It’s a bit rough looking but it seemed like a good idea to annotate around the image rather than try and loosely write about it here…

Jigsaw Clothing Advert from Red Magazine April 2016.

Jigsaw Clothing Advert from Red Magazine April 2016.

Annotation and analysis of Jigsaw advert.

Annotation and analysis of Jigsaw advert.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I followed the same idea with the second advert from the magazine by Burt’s Bee’s:

Burt's Bee's Advert from Red Magazine April 2016.

Burt’s Bee’s Advert from Red Magazine April 2016.

Annotation and analysis of Burt's Bee's advert.

Annotation and analysis of Burt’s Bee’s advert.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although both have different approaches in terms of design layout and content, they have a similar underlying feel of suggesting they or their products are life enhancing. That they as brands value honesty, freedom and creativity. Both feel like efforts to convince you of their trustworthy or investment worthy nature by way of virtue instead of convincing you that you must have their product. I wonder if this is something of a trend in marketing now or just those two companies?

Part 3: Exercise 1 ~ Delivering Information

For this part of the exercise I am finding examples of ways in which visual communications deliver information. I need examples of web based design, print and moving image. I had an idea of a graphic designer who produces info graphics – Sarah Illenberger, but not much of an idea for the web-based design.

Web-based design:

I started by searching through the archives of the V&A collection for posters or leaflets but quickly realised that most of their collection is older and they don’t feature a lot of (if any) webdesign. I remembered the Design Museum was good at tracking trends in design across several areas, including Graphic Design so began by looking at their Designs of the Year 2015. I discovered they had a category for Graphics. Here I discovered a project by Graphic designer Marcel which I think displays information in an interesting way, but also acts as a campaign piece.

The project called – Inglorious fruits & vegetables by Intermarche, was a campaign by the supermarket to reduce food waste by trying to integrate ugly fruits and vegetables into supermarket chains.  The campaign was backed by a powerful, persuasive advertising scheme, which covered TV (commercials), magazines, labelling in food stores and Poster/Billboard adverts.

Inglorious Fruits by Marcel for Intermarche.

Inglorious Fruits by Marcel for Intermarche.

I think this is a really clever design because it visually elevates and glorifies the ugly vegetables or fruit by putting them centre stage, enlarged. Photographing them in a good light reminds me of a photo shoot for a fashion magazine, and how generally we’re used to seeing perfected images whether it’s of people or products. So its a kind of visual challenge to see something imperfect presented in the same format or medium as we have come to see perfect images. The visually are aided by the text which adds to the playful but confronting message – ‘An Ugly Carrot, The Disfigured Eggplant’. Then the lines beneath which remind us it doesn’t actually matter what they look like because their main function is for taste; “An Ugly Carrot…But in a soup who cares”? These posters and images also became the entrance point to introducing the public to facts and figures about Food Wastage, this was the important part to raise consumer awareness and reduce waste by doing so.

Inglorious Fruits Campaign Strategy, Design by Marcel for Intermarche.

Inglorious Fruits Campaign Strategy, Design by Marcel for Intermarche.

The success of the campaign was I think largely due its clever graphics, they are humorous, and the humour helps to stop people being offended when confronted by facts and figures which are being used to tell consumers to shop/behave differently.

 

 

 

Sarah Illengberger:

Is an Designer, Illustrator, Art Director based in Berlin, whose work is often 3-D, and explores unconventional ways of displaying information or conveying a point. I came across her a little while ago and wanted a chance to talk about her work. I think this is a good an exercise to talk about her work because I think she’s part of a growing set of creative’s who are looking to push the presentation of information into a more visual format.

The 10 Best Books of the Year by Sarah Illenberger for The New York Times.

The 10 Best Books of the Year by Sarah Illenberger for The New York Times.

In this cover for the New York Times book review she created paper rosette’s out the book jackets of the chosen books for the year. It’s a fun way of tying the visual to the idea of an awards ceremony, with the rosette’s as prizes.

 

 

 

Chilli Con Carne by Sarah Illenberger for Enroute Magazine. Taken from self-titled book published by Gestalten.

Chilli Con Carne by Sarah Illenberger for Enroute Magazine. Taken from self-titled book published by Gestalten.

The image here shows her work for Enroute Magazine. She hand made from paper the ingredients for a complex chilli con carne, I think it works really well. You get the idea that these are ingredients for a meal, and the sense that its a complex one, but it’s not 100% clear what meal as there’s been an omission of text. I manges to link in my mind cooking to art, as form of creativity. I think its an interesting way to display ingredients. I wonder if you could effectively display the making process through paper cutting or whether that would become to complex a task to convey without and text instructions.

Chilli Con Carne by Sarah Illenberger for Enroute Magazine. Taken from self-titled book published by Gestalten.

Chilli Con Carne by Sarah Illenberger for Enroute Magazine. Taken from self-titled book published by Gestalten.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also wanted to make reference to a series of Infographic’s she produced for Neon magazine following the results of a survey on the sexual life of young people in 2007. I know it’s an odd topic to mention but I guess what I find interesting if her way of presenting that information in a way that’s palatable. It’s handled sensitively, and humorously, without having to use seedy images of men or women half naked or have cartoon of certain activity. For me that’s interesting as an example of finding ways to bring more taboo subjects into consideration without causing offensive or being vulgar. Here’s the link to the magazine pages.