Exercise: Working to a Brief – Brief 1

Brief 1:

What am I being asked to do?

Create packaging for a product, ‘chilled creamy oats’ for an established company, ‘Quaker’s’. The product has a targeted audience – “young women juggling many jobs and priorities everyday”.

What are the key words?

key words include: “chilled creamy oats”, “truly delicious healthy snack” – both could be seen on the packaging. “young women”, also sense of busyness of targeted audience. Suggests client is looking for something that is exciting/fresh looking and convenient, stops the women thinking of oats as “bland and unappealing”.

How will the client judge a successful outcome?

Client is looking for something to appeal to a young female audience and wanting to persuade them that their product is a quick way of having a “truly delicious healthy snack”. This suggests to me that they are looking for something that is new/current in style/bright? But that also communicates health benefit and convenience.  It’s upon those factors that they’ll judge how successful the outcome is.

Additional Questions:

I would ask whether they want me to design what would go on the packaging, or whether they want me to design the packaging and design – so do they want me to think about shape and materials and printing methods as well and colours/text and images.

Exercise: Working to brief – Brief 2

Brief 2:

What am I being asked to do?

Create a piece of work of my own choice, to my own choice of audience that; “takes them on a metaphorical journey” exploring the theme of “connections”. Whatever is produced has to be something imaginative that explores the juxtaposition of things that connect.

How will the client judge the successful outcome?

By how ‘imaginative’ the work is, the “quality of the research” and if it “communicates to the viewer the connectedness of the thinking in my design”. Success will also be judged by how well the piece takes the viewer/audience on a journey.

What are the key words?

“Journey”, “connections”, “connectedness”, “broadly as possible” & “juxtaposition”.

Additional questions:

Do they have a medium in mind for this piece? maybe a poster, picture, animation, film. or perhaps product packaging, or a childrens book?

Exercise: Working to a brief – Brief 3

Brief 3:

What am I being asked to do?

Produce something which highlights a campaign for raising awareness among young people & their parents about the risks of alcohol. The work needs to incorporate the slogan “why let drink decide?”  and expose the vulnerable position that alcohol puts young people in. Targeted audience is young people aged between 13-16, but the aim is for this also to cause parents/society to rethink how they talk to young people about alcohol.

How will the client judge a successful outcome?

On whether it portrays the danger of drinking, encourages adults to engage in discussion with their children/young people to discourage excessive drinking. Has to express the ‘vulnerability’ caused by drinking. The media needs to be appealing to 13-16 year old’s, accessible to them.

What are the key words?

“Alcohol leaves you and your children vulnerable”, “why let drink decide”, “raise awareness of the risks of underage drinking”, “contribute in a shift towards a cultural change in society’s attitude towards alcohol.”

 

Exercise: Working to a brief – notes

Having looked at the 3 briefs available I think I would like to tackle the first brief, designing packaging for the Quaker oats company (brief 1)

This is partly due to the comfort of having clear parameters, audience to work for. Also because I love packaging and think it’s possible to make it really fun, appealing. I’d like the challenge of taking something often considered as a product for old people or children and making it appealing to a new audience. In terms of stretching my skills and abilities, I’d like to think it would be quite stretching as I’d use programs like Photoshop/In design to create it which are still very unfamiliar programs to me, so I’d be learning lots as I went through the design process.

I did consider doing brief 2, which is the opposite to brief 1 in terms of being very free, there’s no mention of restrictions in terms of intended audience, what the design should look like. It could be a very fun project, but I think It could also be quite hard to reach a conclusion and get lost in the far reaches of researching something so vast as connections. Everything is connected in some way, so that could be tricky to condense..

The Invisible Man – H.G.Wells

Having chosen The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine as my other two H.G.Wells novels to design a cover for I wasn’t sure what to go for as a third book.

I emailed a friend who recommended The Invisible man –

I think your best bet is probably The Invisible Man, as it’s scientific in nature and one of his more successful and compelling novels. I’ve seen a few covers for this and they’ve never been terribly exciting – the classic visual image for it is usually Griffin in bandages and a dressing gown, so I’d be fascinated to see what else you might come up with. An invisible man is a challenge for graphic design!

And after a little time scanning through Pinterest for covers for the Invisible Man it’s clear that there’s a type cast kind of image for the book, nearly all contained an illustration of  the suit of a man, with a bowling hat, glasses and no head. The trouble is I’m not sure how to move away from this idea.

I did however come across some interesting websites offering tutorials for creating your own invisible man using photo shop and some photos:

http://www.practicalphotoshopmag.com/2012/04/17/how-to-make-an-invisible-man-picture/

I also came across this which could maybe be of use for creating a different form of image, it’s a link to a tutorial on how to create portraits that defy gravity:

http://www.digitalcameraworld.com/2013/01/25/levitation-photography-tutorial-how-to-do-portraits-that-defy-gravity/

Now to come up with something different….

 

Exercise Book Cover Design – The War of the Worlds

I realize I haven’t really written about my process with designing a cover for ‘The War of the worlds’. The research is all in my sketchbook along with annotation but what I haven’t said is I got to a point where I’d made some designs and they weren’t having the affect I had intended.

I had decided to try paper cutting a scene of the martian tripod creatures approaching the London Skyline, I found a photograph of the London Skyline from 1935 which fitted with when the story was set, as the landmarks that appear in the book, one of which is St.Paul’s cathedral so I looked for that.

Photo of London Skyline - 1935

Photo of London Skyline – 1935

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Exercise Book Cover Design: The Time Machine

I had various different ideas for a cover based on the Time Machine, some included illustrations of a time machine, others the sun at different ages and colours (something the main character see’s on his travels). I considered doing a drawing of the evolution of man as is described in the book down to eventual odd crab like creatures.

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Exercise Book Cover Design: The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man was something I was a bit apprehensive about designing a cover for, but as with the Time Machine having features which tied the book covers together made it easier for me to approach the design.

I knew I needed something to have as a central shape, and something to have as a background pattern. Having not read the book before I spent yesterday morning reading the story in the hope of finding ideas for the design as I read. The problem with invisible man, is that he’s invisible which means asides from things he puts on i.e. the infamous hat, sunglasses, bandages, he’s indistinguishable. So I felt like my choice of central shape was limited to those objects, I chose the hat because I hadn’t seen a cover design with just the hat in the center. I’d seen lots of designs feather a bandaged head, hat and glasses though!

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Exercise Book Cover Designs: Finished Cover’s

So here we go, here’s the finished covers. I’ve tried to capture them altogether, in situate (on a book shelf) and as scans for full access to the designs in their imperfect glory.

The Three front covers

The Three front covers

The Covers next to the real books...

The Covers next to the real books…

 

Scans of the three covers

Scans of the three covers

The war of the Worlds Finished Cover The Invisible Man Finished Design

Little note – the Invisible Man cover is more green coloured in reality the scanner has made it a sort of dull yellow.

Exploring hand drawn type faces…

A few weeks ago I posted a question onto the OCA student forum about learning how to progress from hand drawn to digital techniques, here’s what I said:

“I’m studying Graphic Design: Core concepts 1 at the moment. I’ve submitted my first assignment and part of the feedback I received focused on me needing to learn how to combine hand based techniques with digital techniques. This is something I’m interested in but don’t really know how to go about.

For instance, at the moment it’s much easier for me to create lettering by hand. When I design something by hand it looks much more coherent, even much more engaging than if I try doing it all in a program like In Design or Illustrator. Does anyone have any tips for learning how to use these programs to enhance hand rendered techniques?”

I got some surprising replies, a few of which I’ve used to help me learn more. One person in particular encouraged me to pursue hand drawn type and gave some tips for improving hand drawn lettering, which I’m taking on board and doing. Here’s what she said:

“I would suggest printing off a variety of typefaces- a whole alphabet of each, at different sizes.

Try three approaches – firstly choose a lower case letter without ascenders or descenders (such as an a, e, o, etc) draw a pair of tram lines horizontally the height and base of the letter (this is called the x height). Use these tram lines to trace out whole words and short phrases, being conscious about spacing and where to position one letter relative to another,   secondly trace over the type to create words without the tram lines and lastly do the same without tracing.

At each stage it’s good to be aware of the shapes of the letters and how they connect and the spaces between the words. At the last stage allow yourself to distort if you want to- make the letters unique and have personality by varying the line weight, allowing some bits to wobble, or choosing a media to work with which make an interesting line- pens, pencils, felt tips….be experimental- it’s all good for the learning log!

Collecting examples of captions and type that you enjoy and copying them freehand using different materials and maybe at a different scale than they were originally printed will help you to develop a confidence with hand drawing type and a freedom in making your own.”

I began to trace over two different type faces last week, although I’ve re-read what was recommended and I’ve managed to do it slightly differently. I didn’t use tram lines, and instead of print off different sizes of the fonts I’ve done them all the same size but each alphabet in: normal, bold and italic format.

Trace of Banda regular font

Trace of Banda regular font

Trace of Amatic Sc font

Trace of Amatic Sc font

I’m going to do the tram line thing and other recommendations with another font called ‘Adobe caslon pro bold’.

 

 

 

Exploring calligraphy..

I’ve been exploring some site’s which are to do with calligraphy following on from looking at hand drawn lettering.

I came across an artist named Tobias D’albert – a German artist who specialises in calligraphy. His website is here:

http://www.tobiasdalbert.de/

And his Flickr stream is full of some very beautiful calligraphy and art work.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tobiasdalbert/page1/

I’ve also been watching some tutorials from this site, particularly interested in the video’s which demonstrate which tools and brushes to use for calligraphy. I’m not too interested in acquiring lots of fountain pens and nibs, more so in the effect you get using brushes or brush pens to create lettering.

http://eng.calligraphy.com.ua/posts/2012/649/#more-649

I’ll post about any experiments with brushes later.

Exercise: Visualising your ideas – analysing the brief

This is how I approached looking at the brief initially:

What is the brief asking me to do?

  • Design a leaflet for an organisation that wants to attract people to a volunteering task
  • Leaflet needs to explore use of folds
  • Needs space for  4 chunks of 120 words and space for contact/address

Format:

  • need to consider display of leaflet (i.e. will it be posted or in a stand)
  • A4 Paper or larger folded
  • Consider types of paper and format of/types of fold

Key points:

  • Organisers want to attract new people
  • Therefore I need to create something that get’s people’s attention, is worth looking at.

After looking at the brief I decided I wanted a real organisation or volunteering opportunity to base my leaflet on so went to the park to see what a local notice board had to offer. I came across a poster advertising an event showcasing the work of park rangers to keep the park in good order and the poster said they were looking for people to get involved. So I took a photo and then used that to inspire my design work.

Local Poster - Advertising the work of park rangers & inviting people to volunteer

Local Poster – Advertising the work of park rangers & inviting people to volunteer

 

Exercise: Visualising your ideas – Research & Ideas

I started by drawing a simple design for a leaflet based on the ‘Love parks’ theme from the poster I’d seen in the local park. I wanted to start simple, just simple folds, to see what it was like.

Love parks design sketch

Love parks design sketch

'Love parks' leaflet prototype - front

‘Love parks’ leaflet prototype – front

Love parks leaflet - open

Love parks leaflet – open

Love parks leaflet - unfolded

Love parks leaflet – unfolded

As you can see in my sketch I had the unfolding paper over the fold for the outside, which practically wouldn’t work so I moved that further down to sit in the middle below the fold line. The design is fine, but doesn’t really offer any new way of exploring folds. I wanted to see some actual leaflets for a bit of research so dug around for leaflets that I’d kept and came across a few which were much more interesting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise: Visualising your ideas – Research

I found this Global Action leaflet really interesting, it doesn’t look like much from the outside but it’s actually quite a clever design with lots of flaps with information all over the place. I think this makes it feel a bit more interactive than your average four folds leaflet.

Global Action Leaflet - front Cover

Global Action Leaflet – front Cover

Global Action leaflet - center unfolded

Global Action leaflet – center unfolded

Global action leaflet - first set of flaps lifted

Global action leaflet – first set of flaps lifted

Global Action leaflet - second set of flaps lifted

Global Action leaflet – second set of flaps lifted

Global Action leaflet - back of leaflet

Global Action leaflet – back of leaflet

I had a go at making a plain A4 paper version of this to see what the folds looked like, I coloured the flaps differently so I could see where different area’s of information would go.

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Exercise: Visualising your ideas

My next idea was around thinking about shapes that represent parks, naturally parks are often full of tree’s so I thought maybe I could create something with the shape of a tree as a leaflet.

I didn’t want to just have the whole leaflet in the shape of a tree rather have the shape feature. it occurred to me that the inside folds could be in the shape of a tree, and have it open to make the folds accessible. Rather than me drawing this (which may have been wiser) I just went straight to the paper prototype.

Love parks design 2 - front

Love parks design 2 – front

Love parks design 2 - Open

Love parks design 2 – Open

Love parks 2 - unfolded

Love parks 2 – unfolded

This isn’t quite what I’d visualised in my mind. It looks more like a Christmas card design as the tree’s really look like what you might cut out as a Christmas tree design, and the way I’ve cut them out (one shape cut out of paper folded up) just emphasizes that. And the point where the tree’s are connected is so fragile that I don’t think practically it would hold together.

 

Exercise: Visualising your ideas – Design 1

So back to the drawing board I thought about another shape that went with the idea of volunteering to help in a park and it occurred to me that you might practically use a spade to help with gardening, and I thought what if the I designed a leaflet shaped like a spade.

I started off just doing a sketch and then making a plain paper prototype using 3 pieces of A4 paper. The basic idea I had in my mind was a leaflet in the shape of a spade which folded in half and opened to reveal a folded piece of paper which had the chunks of info on and contact details. I also thought this would work well within an open topped envelop/pocket so you could see the handle of the spade sticking out but not initially the whole spade.

prototype 1: Spade in Envelope

prototype 1: Spade in Envelope

Prototype 1: Spade leaflet unfolded

Prototype 1: Spade leaflet unfolded

Prototype 1: Spade leaflet inner fold open

Prototype 1: Spade leaflet inner fold open

 

happy that this sort of worked I set about thinking about types of paper, colours textures and making a variety of prototypes until I found one I was happy with.

Exercise: Visualising your ideas – Design 3

Rethinking the idea of an envelope that looked like ground it occurred to me I could try just a simple brown paper envelope. And that I could write on the envelope a slogan or something about the volunteering task so people knew something about what the thing inside the envelope might be about. I wrote in pencil “Save Your Park”. As a rough idea.

IMG_1514

 

Looking at this in reality I wasn’t happy with it, I didn’t think it would grab people’s attention and therefore attract new people in the way the brief described. So having a little think I thought maybe adding some grass like green card onto the brown envelope would enhance it looking like a spade cutting into the ground. So I gave it a shot on a new envelope.

IMG_1515

 

I still wasn’t convinced this actually looked any good, rather than looking like something aimed at children (which would be fine but the brief didn’t say the target audience were children).

I was showing a friend the design and she said it looked fine, and then I asked her what did she think it was. She said she thought some kind of bag and that the spade didn’t really look like a spade in terms of it’s handle or bottom half. I agreed with her and so suspended working on the envelope to print out a picture of a real spade to use for redesigning the leaflet.

Exercise: Visualising your ideas – Design 4

Having found an image of a spade online I quickly saw how my first spade design did resemble a handbag rather than a spade. So worked on elongating the handle, changing the shape of it and making the spade part a more shaped piece rather than a square. I liked the brown paper and green for the handle of the second design so kept these as features.

Spade Design 3 - front

Spade Design 3 – front

Spade Design 3 - open

Spade Design 3 – open

Spade Design 3 - unfolded

Spade Design 3 – unfolded

I did find that I had to crop the folded paper slightly to get it to sit without being visible before opening. I wasn’t sure if this would mean that I couldn’t get the 4 chunks of 120 words in the small space, so I designed text boxes in word and wrote 120 words in each cutting them out to see if they’d fit into the spaces provided.

Exercise: Visualising your ideas – final design

I wanted to revisit my envelope design and found another flowery wrapping paper, but this one was slightly different, with a beige background and more delicate looking flowers, it actually resembles the ground. So I thought it would make a good envelope.

Envelope design - final one

Envelope design – final one

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Project – Critiquing your work

I just wanted to make a note of what this section in the course talks about and what I need to take from it.

In order to prepare for a critique of my work I will need to learn how to/consider a few things:

1. I need to develop a rationale. A rationale is defined here as:

” a short statement that outlines what you are trying to achieve, how you are going about it and what the results are likely to be”.

I can have multiple rationales where there is more than one direction that can be taken in the brief.

2. Think about how I’m presenting my ideas – a collection of thumbnails, or mood boards or mock up’s

3. Need to summarize the brief as well as writing a rationale.

4. Make time to change designs based on what’s been said during the critique – otherwise it’s pointless!

Research question:How do I approach being self- critical?

Currently I approach being self-critical by referring back to the brief I was given originally and asking myself questions like does it fulfill the brief, where doesn’t it, what could be improved. However I think that often this is too much something I question once I’ve decided I’ve finished the project rather than asking myself at every stage.

What issues does this raise?

The need to practically have a rationale/brief written out at the start of the exercise preferably printed so I can stick it up somewhere and refer back to it as I go.

I need to contact people about being a critique group for my work, obviously my husband is an easy person to ask, but I have friends who are practicing artists or have an interest in design so I’d like to ask them too, so I get a  more broad opinion.

Exercise: Too much or not enough information

Summary of the brief:

Look around your local area, find a local up-coming event i.e. a jumble sale, music festival and design two posters to promote it.

Make the first poster full of information about the event, details such as when, where, what’s happening, cost and what to expect. Include every detail you think the audience requires.

Make the second poster as simple as possible – pare back the information to the minimum. Be extreme with how little you can say but remember to include the essential information or it won’t effectively promote the event.

Rationale One:

Produce a poster promoting a local event of your choice. Make the poster full of information about the event, where it’s taking place, when, what’s going on, timings, cost and what to expect. Include all the details you think your audience may need.

Rationale Two:

Produce a poster promoting a local event of your choice. Make the poster as simple as possible – pare back the information to the minimum. Consider how few words you can use. But don’t forget essential information or the poster won’t effectively promote the event.

Exercise: Too much or not enough information – Summary & rationale

Summary of the brief:

Look around your local area, find a local up-coming event i.e. a jumble sale, music festival and design two posters to promote it.

Make the first poster full of information about the event, details such as when, where, what’s happening, cost and what to expect. Include every detail you think the audience requires.

Make the second poster as simple as possible – pare back the information to the minimum. Be extreme with how little you can say but remember to include the essential information or it won’t effectively promote the event.

 Rationale One:

Produce a poster promoting a local event of your choice. Make the poster full of information about the event, where it’s taking place, when, what’s going on, timings, cost and what to expect. Include all the details you think your audience may need.

Rationale Two:

Produce a poster promoting a local event of your choice. Make the poster as simple as possible – pare back the information to the minimum. Consider how few words you can use. But don’t forget essential information or the poster won’t effectively promote the event.

Exercise: Too much or not enough information – primary research

I took some time on Friday last week to go to a local park as part of primary research – discovering what events were coming up locally to base my posters on.

I took some photo’s of boards in the park with info about upcoming events:

Notice boards in Memorial Park Coventry

Notice boards in Memorial Park Coventry

IMG_1552 IMG_1548 IMG_1549 IMG_1550

Lot’s of these events were already being promoted through posters, and I thought this might be distracting/make it hard for me to create something of my own design. I noticed a website with information about what was on in Coventry run by the council so noted it.

I found a link to a series of upcoming events called ‘Bands in the Parks 2013’:

http://www.coventry.gov.uk/bandsinparks

I think this would make a good event to produce the two posters for, as it’s an event with multiple dates, multiple bands, different venues  therefore plenty of potential to make an leaflet with lots of information but also to produce a distilled simpler poster.

 

 

The Brief & The Rationale

The Brief:

Look around your local area, find a local up-coming event i.e. a jumble sale, music festival and design two posters to promote it.

Make the first poster full of information about the event, details such as when, where, what’s happening, cost and what to expect. Include every detail you think the audience requires.

Make the second poster as simple as possible – pare back the information to the minimum. Be extreme with how little you can say but remember to include the essential information or it won’t effectively promote the event.

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The Outcome: Poster for rationale one

Scan of first poster in response to rationale one

Scan of first poster in response to rationale one

The poster is handmade, made from patterned paper, coloured card, pen drawings. I don’t currently feel confident enough with Photoshop/Adobe Creative Suite to use them to create the posters, hence it’s been made by hand.You’ll probably notice the design is not perfect, please feel free to suggest alternative ways of approaching the brief/making the poster.

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Exercise: Too much or not enough information – rationale 2, linocut

I started to carve out my design of the saxophone and unfortunately it wasn’t till I’d actually taken the first print that I realised I’d not reversed my design so that it was the way round I wanted it to be. So sadly it’s not the right way round, and I don’t think I’ve really got the time to do it all again.

Saxophone Linocut 1/6

Saxophone Linocut 1/6

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Project: Finishing your artwork

Research point:

I’ve been asked to:

  1. Identify the software you have available to deal with desktop publishing, image manipulation and graphics/illustration.
  2. Consider how familiar I am with it.
  3. Consider what I need to learn

1. I have adobe cs6 which contains – illustrator, Photoshop, Indesign (and other programs)

2. I’m probably most familiar with Indesign having used it to create booklets before. I have some limited experience using Photoshop but don’t currently feel confident using it unsupervised/unaided.

3. I need to learn how to comfortably use basic functions in Photoshop and Indesign – I’ve got a training DVD to work through to see if that helps me.

Post critique poster changes…

Following the comments on my critique page I went back to my sketchbook to draw some new poster designs for rationale two.

My focus was on creating a design that had much more flow and movement in it, looked summery, and in which the central information i.e. the title of the event and dates were more of a focal point. I did the designs as pen drawings without colour first to try and get a sense of shapes and text arrangement before thinking about colour scheme’s.

Pen & pencil drawings of new designs

Pen & pencil drawings of new designs

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Final Design for Rationale Two

Below is a photo of the final design for rationale two, I think it has much more movement and a summery feel. I also think the text is now clear making the subject/event clear to the audience.

What do you think?

Final poster

Final poster

Close up of text within the buttons of the saxophone

Close up of text within the buttons of the saxophone

different photo of final poster

different photo of final poster

 

 

Exercise: Too much or not enough information – using illustrator

I last posted a comment about this poster nearly a month ago, and I feel like I’m finally nearing it’s completion. I’ve had two sessions with a friend who’s a graphic designer now, and feel like I have some level of competency with Illustrator and Photoshop.

I’ve made fairly substantial changes to the design of the poster. Here’s how it looked before:

Overall photo of poster one

Overall photo of poster one

And this is what the poster looks like now:

Bands in the park poster v.2

Bands in the park poster v.2

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New Design for Rationale One

I’ve been working on a new version of a poster for rationale one. A quick recap for you about rationale one:

Produce a poster promoting a local event of your choice. Make the poster full of information about the event, where it’s taking place, when, what’s going on, timings, cost and what to expect. Include as much detail as possible for your audience.

This was my initial design for the rationale (see image below):

Overall photo of poster one

Old version of poster

And this is my new and hopefully improved design:

new version

New version of poster

I’d love to hear what you think about the colour scheme – I was going for something a little old jazz/smooth looking rather than bright and funky.

What do you think of the daisies? Are they enough of a hint towards the event being in a park or is something else needed?

Is the text/information clear enough – does it need to be bigger, smaller or a different colour? Feel free to comment on what you think works or doesn’t work within the poster.

Look forward to hearing your thoughts!!

 

 

Exercise: Point of sale display – the brief

Analyzing the brief

What am I being asked to do?

Create a ‘point of sale display’ to go above the fruit and vegetables in my local green grocers shop. The final size of the display will be 2 X A1 Landscape ( so I need to design smaller but with the ability to enlarge it in mind).

Method/How – I am allowed to either work with photograph’s, create illustrations or use both to produce two images one of fruit the other of vegetables. I can use individual fruits/veg or cut up/segments or all of the above.

I need to identifying any wording and make sure – its visible from far away & attracts attention.

How will the client judge a successful outcome to the brief?

Display must be visible from street – clear and dynamic.

Will be judged on how attractive/eye catching it is as it needs to draw customers in. Will judge whether or not it makes their product look attractive – does it look edible , delicious etc.

Does appeal to their audience?

What are the key words?

wording of the sign needs to be – ‘clear and dynamic

Ask myself – Does this look edible? Would I like to eat it?

Posters will be seen from a distance ‘so visuals need to be clear and dynamic

I need to be ‘especially conscious about the way I use colour to describe tone, shadow and surface marks‘ – poor choices can make food look unappealing, moldy etc

Audience:

“The shop is in a small precinct which also houses a baker, a newsagent, an independent shop and is on route to and from a well respected primary school.”

What I think of as the audience is: likely middle class, parents, mostly mums/women , people who are interested in more craft/artisan objects.

Ideas for Point of Sale Display

I began research just looking on pinterest for Green grocers, I just wanted to get an idea for what kind of design was out there, even just the shape/layout of green grocer stores. I created a board and pinned a few things, when I came across a green grocer’s in Australia called, The Little Green Grocer, which had some interesting window displays. http://www.broadsheet.com.au/melbourne/food-and-drink/article/little-green-grocer-next-door-coin-laundry The window display was created by an artist/graphic designer called Amelia Lackman. http://www.amelialackmann.com.au/projects/the-little-grocer

Photo 1 of 'Little Grocer Shop front' by Amelia Lackman

Photo 1 of ‘Little Grocer Shop front’ by Amelia Lackman

Photo 2 of 'Little Grocer' by Amelia Lackman

Photo 2 of ‘Little Grocer’ by Amelia Lackman

Photo 3 of 'Little Grocer' by Amelia Lackman

Photo 3 of ‘Little Grocer’ by Amelia Lackman

What I like about Amelia’s window displays is that it fits with the unique/small almost specialist nature of the shop. The designs don’t have any colour though so perhaps not as eye catching as the client in my brief would like.

I also came across this grill/bar/cafe which had bold type on it’s wall which were visible from the front of the store. The kind of thing that would catch your eye from a distance even though you couldn’t tell what it said and cause you to take a closer look. This might be the level of colour that would draw more people into the green grocers store.

Wishbone Restaurant - Outside

Wishbone Restaurant – Outside

Wishbone Restaurant Inside

Wishbone Restaurant Inside

So my current thoughts are some kind of simple shapes of fruit and veg that are brightly coloured with text either within or outside it saying things about the quality of the fruit and veg. Possible words could be : Fresh, Tasty, Organic, Delicious, Healthy, Locally grown. These words especially ‘organic & locally grown’ would probably appeal to a middle class mum who’s concern might be making sure what she gives her kids is clean and good for the environment.

Final design for Poster based on rationale one

Hi again,

I’ve been working on a few changes following Lorsen’s feedback and this is my final version of the poster. I’m aware I could still make more changes and Maria made some suggestions that if i had more time I’d like to try but as I’ve spent probably too long on this project I’m choosing to leave it as it is.

In the end I changed the title font to one within the program, as opposed to my hand drawn version (to make it more legible) and made all the font bold. I’ve added a whole load of daisies and musical notes from hand drawings in an effort to add so movement to the image.

It’s not perfect but in general I’m pleased with the outcome, take a look for yourselves below:

Final Poster design for rationale one

Final Poster design for rationale one

 

Point of Sale Display – Design in stages

Point of sale display FRUIT AND VEG

Above is the basic fruit shapes I started with in Illustrator having drawn them in a sketchbook first and then live traced them in illustrator to create vector shapes. I chose to work in illustrator because I knew creating vector art work would mean the finished work could be scaled up to the size requested in the brief (2 X A1 landscape) without the quality of the work being compromised.

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New exercise – ‘Point of Sale Display’

The Brief:

Create a ‘point of sale display’ to go above the fruit and vegetables in a local green grocers shop. The shop is in a small precinct which houses a baker, a newsagent, an independent shoe shop and is on the route to and from a respected primary school.

The final size of the display will be 2 X A1 Landscape.  I am allowed to either work with photograph’s, create illustrations or use both to produce two images one of fruit the other of vegetables. I can use individual fruits/veg or cut up/segments or all of the above.

Here are two possible versions of the design:

Point of Sale Display V1

Point of Sale Display Version 1

 

Point of Sale Display Version 2

Point of Sale Display Version 2

As you look at the two designs please comment on:

  1. The Wording of the sign: it needs to be – ‘clear and dynamic
  2. Ask yourself  – Does the fruit look edible? Would I like to eat it? If not can you say why not/what might improve it?
  3. Is the overall design ‘clear and dynamic‘? Would it catch your eye from a distance?

Can you see a  ‘conscious decision about the use colour to describe tone, shadow and surface marks‘ – poor choices can make food look unappealing, moldy etc.

Feel free to make any other comments/observations.

Thanks again…

Assignment Two: Thinking of You – The Brief

The Brief:

“Create a range of cards for sentiments or events that are worthy of a greetings card, but are currently not catered for by card manufacturers. The cards could be linked to other calendar events, obscure saints days, sporting calendars or anything else that is worth celebrating or commiserating.”

“You may with to explore some of life’s other landmarks that currently don’t feature in greetings cards, like getting your first grey hairs, being released from prison or any other personal landmark someone might want to share.”

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‘Thinking of You’ – Research

I began my research by brain storming around key words from the brief namely; ‘landmarks’, ‘Unusual calendar events/days’.

Shooting off the word ‘landmarks’ I had a few categories, ‘regrets’, ‘firsts’, ‘lasts’, ‘health/goals’. Below is a photo of the brainstorm.

Landmarks

Landmarks

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‘Thinking of You’ research: Cards

 

The Cards that follow are cards I’ve kept from a range of occasions and have chosen for elements of their design which appeal to me, and I wanted to have as a visual for designs.

'Another year older' by Caroline Gardner

‘Another year older’ by Caroline Gardner

 

 

 

'Wedding Day' by Caroline Gardner

‘Wedding Day’ by Caroline Gardner

 

 

'Happy Birthday Card by Caroline Gardner'

‘Happy Birthday Card by Caroline Gardner’

 

'Mr & Mrs' Card by Tescos

‘Mr & Mrs’ Card by Tesco’s

 

'Yip pea' Birthday Card by Paperchase

‘Yip pea’ Birthday Card by Paperchase

 

'Dinosaur Card by Chow Hon Lam

‘Dinosaur Card by Chow Hon Lam

 

 

 

 

 

‘Thinking of You’- Initial Design Ideas

After brain storming and looking into other card designs, I began doing some drawings in my sketchbook based on the theme of celebrating weight gain. I created a character to go on the front of the card in an illustrative style.

First drawing for Card Design - creating a character to go with the wording

First drawing for Card Design – creating a character to go with the wording

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‘Thinking of You’ – working in Adobe Illustrator

As a beginner level user of Illustrator I had only really developed a  few ways of creating illustrations within the program, mainly those taught to me by friends. As I started working on the card design I went about it in the same way as I already knew, and discovered this wasn’t producing the results I wanted.

My starting method was to take the scan of the girl with the pie and using Photoshop to make the colours cleaner (i.e. the black black and the white, white) I selected the shadows and then dragged and dropped the girl into Illustrator. From there I would use Image trace to turn the image into a vector based image, and begin adding colours from there.

Girl Illustration created using Image Trace

Girl Illustration created using Image Trace

However this time I felt like the Image trace had not achieved the look I’d hoped for. The girl had lost some of the character from the original drawing. So I began to think about other ways of approaching creating the same character in Illustrator.

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‘Thinking of You’ – Completing Card 1

Below I’ve started with a copy of how the first card looked and then how I’ve changed it to finish it:

'Who ate all the Pies v2'

‘Who ate all the Pies v2’

Final Version

Final Version

I didn’t change too much just adjusted some colours adding in some pink for the cheeks, and including a grey outline around the face and legs just to add some definition. I also changed the colour of the text to seem less accusatory/negative, the red looked more like a threat, so the purple/red is a bit more warming.

I also worked on the inside of the card, I wanted to keep it simple, but complete the idea started on the front. I think I achieved this by using the same banner and writing and completing the sentence. The little piece of pie in the corner is just a fun touch.

Inside of Card v1

Inside of Card v1

Inside of card v2 (final)

Inside of card v2 (final)

I think the text on the inside of the card helps the reader realize the card is celebrating the persons weight gain as an landmark in their life, rather than making fun of the person. It’s a thin line between being an insult and a compliment so I hope overall I’ve got it on the compliment side! I also think the banners help add some movement and colour as well as a visual link to the design on the front (which works well).

 

 

 

 

‘Thinking of You’ – Card 2

Champion/Podium Inspiration

Champion/Podium Inspiration

I had the idea of incorporating a podium for a character to stand on to emphasis the phrase ‘weight loss champion’. But I needed a reminder of how a podium looked and how people looked standing on one to help me to draw my character. Below are my initial drawings in a sketchbook.

First two sketches of champion character

First two sketches of champion character

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‘Thinking of You’ Card 3

The design of the third card was much easier than the previous too, simply because I took elements of the first card and simplified them to make a different design. This might sound like cheating but I think it’s fine given that the cards are in a range around the theme of weight loss/ weight gain and it would give a customer a bit more choice.

So here’s the design of the third card, front and inside:

Front of Card 3

Front of Card 3

Inside of Card 3

Inside of Card 3

For the front of the card I’ve allowed the pie pattern to take center stage as I think alone it still feels light hearted and doesn’t make me think that the card has a derogatory message. I changed the size and colour of the text on the banner just to sit better with the colours coming from the pies. I asked my husband what he thought when he came home from work and he agreed that it was simple but worked well, and that it was nice to see the pattern with a character in front of it.

The inside of the card is the same as the design for card one, simply because it worked well so I saw no real need to change it, I think the front of the card is what will attract people to the card.

 

‘Thinking of You’ – preparing & printing the cards

This stage was a little trickier than I anticipated, I knew I had software that would allow me to produce greeting cards for print but I didn’t really know how best to use it. I ended up opting for Indesign as I had a little understanding of how it worked and thought the format might be a bit more logical. I looked around online for some advice on greeting card design and found a few helpful sites.

I then set about designing the templates for the card and placing the illustrator files into the boxes created. After a little bit of adjusting I had a card ready for print here’s how it looked:

Card 3 ready for printing

Card 3 ready for printing

I then set about trying to print off the card. This was the bit that got confusing for me. I initially tried printing onto A4 thinking I’d cut the paper down later, but found it confusing to get the inside part of the card in the right place. After a few wrong attempts I decided to cut the paper down so that it was A5 size prior to printing, and to set my printer to print from that size. This was much easier! I tried it in black and white just to see how it worked, here’s how it turned out:

Outside of trial card

Outside of trial card

Inside of trial card

Inside of trial card

You’ll notice the images now have borders – this wasn’t an initial part of my design in Illustrator but my printer doesn’t do border-less printing so I created some small borders in Indesign to allow for this.

A couple of things need adjusting on the second card design, in the photo below you’ll see the banner on the inside of the card was slightly cropped in printing, so I moved the image so the banner wasn’t being cropped:

IMG_1930

 

I printed the finished cards onto thin cream coloured card as this seemed to suit the colours of the designs and bring a unifying factor to all the cards. I think it looks a little warmer, maybe even a bit more professional on the cream coloured card instead of white. It would’ve been nice to try on different cards, but this was what we had/could afford.

The three completed cards

The three completed cards

The envelopes for the cards are simple white paper based, suitable for A5 cards. Again this is due to them being the envelopes we had, if I have time/money I’ll look for some cream envelopes to go with the cards, to help complete the look. I chose not to devote any real thought/time to designs on the envelope as I felt this would detract from me getting the main thing sorted (i.e. the 3 card designs). If I’d felt more confident/practiced using Illustrator and Indesign (and therefore able to produce the card designs faster) I would’ve given myself some time to consider more interesting envelope designs.

Overall I’m fairly pleased with how the cards turned out.